Wednesday, March 25, 2009

Secondary Roads and Rural Views







In just four days, we'll start on our month-long 3,000 mile road trip to and from New Mexico. Because going there is part of the experience, we'll be taking secondary roads rather than highways whenever possible. As I have been packing and reviewing travel materials, I've be sorting out in my mind what sorts of things I'll be on the lookout for as we travel. In the process, I've been browsing photos of past trips and reflecting on what I've taken and what I wish that I had.

On of the joys I've found with modern photography is that you can take as many photos as you want and then sort it all out later. With a memory stick of 1 GB, you're not limited to a roll of 24 photos and the expense of development. You also have your compact photo lab in laptop form without the darkroom and chemical solutions. Given that, it seems that opportunities are practically unlimited. Well, they are, sort of.

Those of you who have been following my posts, have viewed a number of rural scenes like those in this set. The secondary roads take you away from urban settings to places that are truly unique. There, you can avoid the McDonaldesque-regardless of the country that you are in. In is in these settings that you can gather images of the land and its character. Eventually, the secondary roads lead you to urban areas. Even in urban settings, it is still possible to find culture and tradition that has not be homogenized. These are the experiences that I'm hoping to find in one form or another on our trip. Hopefully I will be able to share those experiences with you.

Thank you for visiting. Please feel free to leave a comment, they are always appreciated. May your own travels be both interesting and enjoyable.

Kerry

Wednesday, March 18, 2009

Natural Glimpses of Wisconsin






My usual posting has shown you places that I have traveled to, some places far from where I now live. One of the reasons that I have settled here is that there are aspects of natural beauty just a short bicycle ride from my home. These are the images that I would like to share with you this time. As you see, the images that were chosen are those of Spring and Summer. The western shore of Lake Michigan takes a completely different aspect during the colder months but I, for one, am ready for days of warmth, greenery, and sunlight. It is the aspects of greenery that are now shared with you. Perhaps during the heat of July or August, when the sun is beating down and Wisconsinites are sweltering, I'll share some scenes of ice and snow.

In another week it's off to the American Southwest to New Mexico. Hopefully the desert will be in bloom. In any case, my camera will be in hand and I'll try to capture some of the flavor of the area. I'm even going to try to work on my inhibitions in regards to taking images of people. We'll see how that goes, if I can find a way to be unobtrusive. A lot depends on the regional culture, something I will have to get a feel for. In any event,will try to post a couple of times during the month's travel. Please do stop by if you can.

Thank you for visiting. Please feel free to leave a comment if you are so inclined, I enjoy reading what you have to say. As always, enjoy your own travels. Dare to venture beyond your present horizon and experience what is there.

Kerry

Tuesday, March 10, 2009

Paris in the Sun






Outside my window is a cold, wet, gray late winter day. In my mind, however, is Paris in the sun. These images of Paris give me purpose and energy that today's weather can not take away. Most of these photos were taken as I wandered randomly along the streets (I do a lot of random wandering-I like surprises). The photo of Notre Dame Cathedral was taken from the deck of a Batobus, a water bus that travels through parts of the city along the Seine. If, like me, you are experiencing the end of winter and the hope of spring, I hope that these photos give you some relief from it all and some encouragement as well. Spring will happen, and soon.


Thank you for visiting. Please feel free to leave a comment if you are so inclined, I enjoy reading what you have to say. As always, enjoy your own travels. Dare to venture beyond your present horizon and experience what is there.

Kerry

Monday, March 2, 2009

Within Walls







The concept of a walled city is "foreign" to me in the true sense of the word. A world where everyone knows everyone else and walls, gates, and guards screen out those who wish to enter the community. In another time and place, walled communities were a necessity due to both lawlessness and ethnocentric rivalries. Today, there are no guards and strangers freely enter this ancient Tuscan city. In other parts of the world, it is the wealthy who are creating gated cities to keep "strangers" out, unless the "stranger" has a work pass to temporarily enter as a gardener, cook, or housekeeper. A different set of circumstances all together than the nature of the traditional walled community, perhaps.

I hope that you enjoy your visual trip through the city. I tried to capture the sense of the gates and the winding narrow streets that open up into spacious squares. Unlike most of my posts, I was able to capture some of the people in their everyday activities. The weekly market in the square, the woman collecting water from the communal fountain, and the street guitarist were the scenes that stood out when I was sorting through my collection.

Thank you for visiting. Please feel free to leave a comment if you are so inclined, I enjoy reading what you have to say. As always, enjoy your own travels. Dare to venture beyond your present horizon and experience what is there.

Kerry